Accessibility for disabled

accessibility

(Eden) #1

Hello friends,
Maybe someone can help me with feature can be able to Accessibility for disabled?

I know It’s difficult, if not impossible, to design generically for all disabilities
But at least try something …
Font size
Utilize color control
Describe The Links or clickable with sound

I would be happy for any help from you.

Thanks


#2

Hi Eden:

Here’s a great place to start: Accessibility Tips & Tricks: A 508 Accessibility Checklist for your Tumult Hype project

Accessibility is definitely a moving target, so if you hit any issues as you work on Tumult Hype documents please let us know!


(Eden) #3

Thanks Daniel
Your support is always second to none and I appreciated it

Unfortunately I do not have time to spare to start from the beginning … so I turn here for ask maybe there is someone here with the hype file is ready can share or if someone can help with this file.

I’m sure it will be helpful for a lot of people need it.


#4

Accessibility is more of a set of design guidelines to keep in mind as you work. If your document is image-heavy, contains forms, or contains links, you will need to do different things. What I’m saying is that there isn’t a template for accessibility in the same way that there isn’t a template for ‘legible text’.

For a more visual guide to accessible design, check out this work from Google: https://material.google.com/usability/accessibility.html#


(Eden) #5

I got it thank you


(Eden) #6

Hi friends, I found a great tool is free and you can use it …
Just embed code and it works!

https://userway.org


Accessibility Tips & Tricks: A 508 Accessibility Checklist for your Tumult Hype project
#7

Pretty cool. This tool lets you override aspects of your design to make text, links, and colors more accessible – works well with Hype documents:


#8

I’m not sure why this thread returned. The dates of the last two posts are March 9, 2017.

Eh, I have experience with building accessible websites, so maybe some additional information will help.

Generally, you don’t design for all conceivable disabilities, you design to meet the guidelines related to accessibility. This is know as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

It’s a lot to know, so there’s software to make it easier to test a website…

Depending on the website, there might be stricter guidelines to follow. There’s a dramatic increase in difficulty when designing for WCAG A, AA and AAA.

This is probably really easy to do with Hype. You could just use the “Font Size” timeline property and some buttons. Depending on which button is pressed, different sized text is shown. Although, that means manually editing every element in your scene with new font sizes. (Normally, I let the visitor set their font size. But if it was a project requirement, I’d probably use JavaScript to set the size. This is more complicated to do though.)

Again, this can be done with a Timeline property. There are filters for “Contrast”, “Hue” and “Saturation”, which could be used to adjust the coloring of elements. By dropping the saturation to zero, and increasing the contrast, that could improve the view.

This can also be done with JavaScript.

Here’s an example…

It’s an incomplete project. But in classic mode, the Hue and Saturation can be adjusted in the settings. (That game wasn’t designed to be accessible though.)

Sound files can be added to Hype. Again, JavaScript might be a better answer. There’s a text-to-speech option. That way, you don’t have to include large sound files.

This is correct. Although, maybe a “Best Practices” document would be helpful. Normally, I don’t design Hype projects to be accessible. I just block the whole thing out with an ARIA tag.

Yet, it is interesting to think about what could be done with Hype to make life easier for people with disabilities. Large text, high contrast, voice over… this might be a good idea for a template. But if the settings are changed after the page is loaded, it probably wouldn’t pass an automated accessibility check.