IE11 video error


(Steve Flowers) #1

In limited testing, I have one user that has provided feedback that the video isn’t loading in IE11. I’ve tested and it loads fine so I wonder if there’s a version issue or maybe the way I’m encoding the video. Here’s the error:

**Just noticed that this was in the wrong category:(


(Nick ) #2

Did you save the video file in a windows compatible format?
IE requires the H.264 or MPEG-4 codec and The Microsoft H.264 decoder supports only 1920x1088 pixels in Windows 7

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ie/hh924821(v=vs.85).aspx


(Steve Flowers) #3

I think that was the problem. Awaiting updated testing results. The original video was H.264 but wider than 2000 pixels. What’s strange, I re-encoded the video to 960px wide and the file size went up… almost double.


(Nick ) #4

Yeah I have seen that sometimes too.
Here is a great reference for video compression and file sizes.

http://www.learningsolutionsmag.com/articles/1203/video-compression-secrets-smaller-files-better-quality


(Nick ) #5

Found a possible solution for you to reduce the file size…but I think there will be a fine line between small file size and lesser quality.

"File size is determined entirely by bitrate. If you want a smaller file size, you will need to reduce your bitrate. The lower the bitrate, the lower the quality of the file. So for example, so with your overall bitrate of 1,182 kb/s, for 22:44 (1,360 seconds), you’ll have a file size (not including audio) of approx 1,607,520 kilobits, or about 200 MB. If you want to reduce your file size to 100 MB, you’ll need to cut your bitrate in half.

The best thing to do to retain good quality is to do a 2-pass variable bitrate encoding. This scans the video for frame information on the first pass, and then uses it on the second pass to better predict pixel motion, scene changes, etc. So you get higher quality with the same file size.

With VBR, you will need to set a target bit rate and a maximum bitrate. You want your file size to be under 100 MB, so I would do a target bitrate of 500 Kb/s, with a max bitrate of 1 Mb/s. This will allow the encoding to use less space when it can, and more space when it needs to, and depending on the content of the video you should average around 500 Kb/s, giving you a file size of around 100 MB or less. If you are not happy with the quality at this bitrate, then try reducing your frame size to see if it looks any better.

Different encoding programs give you different options, for example, I don’t think SUPER gives you the option of doing VBR. As a video editor, I work in Adobe and use Adobe Media Encoder, so I couldn’t tell you which program works best, but any that give you those options should use the same codecs and give you very similar, if not the same, results."


#6

You might be hitting this issue: Fixing broken video, audio, & fonts and configuring your server to correctly serve content under the correct content-type

If your server isn’t sending out the correct mime headers some browser might not know what to do with the video.


(Steve Flowers) #7

That was my first thought. But I’ve never had an issue playing MP4’s from the host. It turns out it was the Windows 7 video size restriction. IE11 Win 7 pukes on large videos. Reprocessed it to 960 wide and all is well.